Get Involved!

Come Join Indiana’s New Watershed Steward Program!

We are looking for people with a keen interest in the environment, a willingness to learn, and most importantly, a strong desire to make a difference in the community.  Whether you are a teacher, an accountant, a construction worker, a homemaker, a retiree, or you name it, YOU can become a Master Watershed Steward in Indiana!

Many states around the country offer Master Watershed Steward Programs that train volunteers in the basics of maintaining and enhancing water resources.  In Indiana, the Master Watershed Steward program is open to all residents in Indiana and especially those residents who live, work, or play in the coastal counties of Lake, Porter, and LaPorte.

To become a certified Master Watershed Steward, you must complete 12 weeks of training.  After completing the classes, you will take an exam.  If you score 70 percent or greater, you will become an Indiana Master Watershed Steward intern.  To become certified you must complete 35 hours of volunteer service over a two year period.  To remain a certified Steward, you must maintain your training by completing six hours of approved training and at least 12 hours of volunteer service annually.

We will help you identify opportunities that fit your interests.

CEUs are available for educators!

 

Contact Leslie Dorworth at (219) 989-2726 or ldorwort@pnw.edu for more information.



Example Projects Include:

  • Organizing workshops and booths to share information about managing stormwater and preventing pollution, including rain barrels and rain gardens, understanding wildlife, or controlling invasive plants.
  • Joining a local watershed group.
  • Working with community leaders to find creative solutions to protect local waterways.
  • Monitoring streams for habitat, biology, and water chemistry.
  • Assisting with restoring streamside vegetation.
  • Organizing and implementing stream clean ups.
  • Get involved with NOAA’s Citizen Science Marine Debris Program
  • Learn about wetlands and invasive plants